Cerebral Palsy (CP)

How can TheraTogs contribute to the management of children with CP? Competent limb use begins with trunk and pelvic alignment and control and adequate body awareness and sensory input.  Therefore, regardless of the CP subtype or level of severity, we recommend beginning to use TheraTogs garments to support the acquisition of  these fundamental, core components […]

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Postural Problems

How can TheraTogs contribute to the management of children with flexible kyphosis and/or lordosis? TheraTogs undergarments and strapping systems are designed to sustain gains in functioning joint alignment that are made either actively or with unforced manual facilitation. The undergarments provide a gentle, mechanical assist and attachment sites for strapping that shortens the long muscles […]

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Strength Deficit

Weakness is defined as a lack of strength and the inability to generate normal voluntary force in a muscle.[1]  It is a feature of several neuromotor disorders that are characterized by faulty movements, altered muscle tone, and postural and joint malalignments – the latter a causative factor without neural concerns. [2],[3],[4]  Weakness is a also common aspect […]

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Athetoid/Dyskinetic CP

How can TheraTogs help in the management of ADCP (Athetoid/Dyskinetic Cerebral Palsy)? The presence of continuous, uncontrolled movements interferes with the acquisition and maintenance of postural control and with effective limb use. Because postural control – the ability to sustain a posture while attending to and engaged in a purposeful activity – is the foundation […]

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Developmental Delay

How can TheraTogs contribute to the management of developmental delay? Competent limb use begins with trunk and pelvic alignment and control and with adequate body awareness and sensory input. Therefore, regardless of the cause or level of severity of a delay in development, we recommend beginning to use TheraTogs garments to support the acquisition of  […]

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Dystonic CP

Dystonia is an extrapyramidal subtype of dyskinetic cerebral palsy (CP) in which involuntary movements occur due to dysfunction of the basal ganglia in the brain. How can TheraTogs contribute to the management of dystonic CP? The presence of uncontrolled movements interferes with the processing of somatosensory information from muscles, joints, and skin, with the  acquisition […]

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Hypotonia

Hypo (low) tonia (tone or tension in muscles) is evident in a state of hypermobility of the trunk and limb joints. How can TheraTogs contribute to the management of children with hypotonia? Generalized hypotonia diminishes the function of the somatosensory (position and movement) receptors in joints and muscles, contributing to delays and deficits in the […]

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Ataxic CP

Ataxia is defined as an inability to generate a normal or expected voluntary movement trajectory through space that reveals coordinated, functional precision. The ataxic deficit in movement precision is not attributed to weakness or to involuntary muscle activity.[1] How can TheraTogs contribute to the management of children with ataxic CP? TheraTogs systems are perfectly suited […]

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Quadriplegic CP

Quadriplegic CP is a subcategory of cerebral palsy (CP) that pertains to those who show a functional deficit (paresis) in the trunk, neck, and all 4 (quad) extremities. Quadriplegia occurs in approximately 6% of the population of children with CP.[1]   Many of this group of children are severely involved. How can TheraTogs Systems contribute […]

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Balance Deficit

Posture control is fundamental to the efficient performance of all activities of daily living . Difficulty maintaining balance occurs in several neuromotor conditions. Please refer to the following list for a discussion of the condition-specific role of TheraTogs in the management of balance deficit: Ataxia ADHD SMD (commonly known as SPD) Hypotonia Cerebral Palsy Brain […]

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Hemiplegic CP

Hemiplegia is a complex disorder that is compounded by the child’s ability to find strategies using the less affected extremities that compensate for the difficulties encountered on the affected side. The result is a progressive deterioration of function, size, muscle extensibility, and use-related bone growth and formation in the limbs on the affected side. How […]

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