Hypotonia

Hypo (low) tonia (tone or tension in muscles) is evident in a state of hypermobility of the trunk and limb joints.

How can TheraTogs contribute to the management of children with hypotonia?

Generalized hypotonia diminishes the function of the somatosensory (position and movement) receptors in joints and muscles, contributing to delays and deficits in the development of postural control and gross motor skills.[1]  The relaxed postures impose lengthening on supporting muscles, which  compromises their strength.

As shown below, TheraTogs garments are designed to deliver the enhanced somatosensory input and gentle mechanical stability of a customized body hug. Strapping is provided for use in improving the alignment of the spine and pelvis, to shorten long muscles – usually abdominals – and allow them to work in shortened state, and to reduce the functioning  base of support in order to increase activity in the trunk and hip muscles.

Hyptonia_B+A_comp

Related Sciences:

Applicable Therapy Approaches:

Applicable TheraTogs Systems

These TheraTogs products support therapy goals for children with hypotonia:

About Hypotonia

As a diagnosis, hypotonia lacks clear definition. In a study undertaken to identify more specific characteristics of hypotonia, pediatric physical and occupational therapists agreed on these identifying features: decreased strength, decreased activity tolerance, delayed motor skill development, rounded shoulder posture with a tendency to lean onto supports, hypermobile joints, increased flexibility, and poor attention and motivation.[2]

Hypotonia is evident in children with these diagnoses (among others):

References

  1. Pereira K, Basso RP, Lindquist AR, da Silva LG, Tudella E. 2013. Infants with Down syndrome: percentage and age for acquisition of gross motor skills. Res Dev Disabil. 34(3):894-901.
  2. Martin K, Inman J, Kirschner A, et al. 2005. Characteristics of hypotonia in children: a consensus opinion of pediatric occupational and physical therapists. Pediatr Phys Ther. 2005 Winter;17(4):275-82.